Mental Health First Aid Through a First Nations Perspective
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IFNMI19-30 Mental Health First Aid Through a First Nations Perspective
Presented by: Amanda Lynn Petit & Ashley Norton
Located at: St. Paul Regional High School Room 220
4701 - 44 Street, St. Paul, AB
About the Session

Mental Health First Aid First Nations is a spark that awakens the courage to have open and honest conversations about mental health with family, friends, and others. It is part of a larger journey that helps strengthen the connections within communities.

This course is for everybody who takes it in a First Nations community setting. It is designed to speak to First Nations participants about mental health, where participants reflect on their life experiences and acknowledge the historical context of that experience. And from this, explore ways to restore balance on their journey to wellness.

The EAGLE Model

In the MHFA course, you will gain a solid understanding of the 5 basic actions of EAGLE:

Engage and evaluate the risk of suicide or harm

Assist the person to seek professional help

Give reassurance and information

Listen without judgment

Encourage self-help strategies and gather community supports

EAGLE is the framework for having a confident conversation about mental health with family, friends, colleagues, and strangers.

Key Outcomes

  • Increase awareness of the signs and symptoms of the most common mental health problems
  • Increase awareness of the pathways to recovery
  • Increase confidence and skills to help those developing a mental health problem or in crisis

Crisis First Aid Skills To Be Learned

  • Substance Overdose, acute stress reaction, panic attack, suicidal behavior, self-harm and psychotic episode

Course Details

  1. Mental Health Journey
  2. Foundations of Mental Health First Aid
  3. Pathways to Recovery: Mood-related Disorders
  4. Pathways to Recovery: Substance-related Disorders
  5. Pathways to Recovery: Self-Harm
  6. Pathways to Recovery: Anxiety and Trauma-related Disorders
  7. Pathways to Recovery: Psychotic Disorder
  8. Journey to Wellness

This learning opportunity is being offered through curriculum implementation funding from Alberta Education.

About the Presenter(s)

Amanda Lynn Petit Hello, I am Amanda, I want to start off with saying thanks for taking the time to read my bio. Well let’s see, my choice of career is Counselling, I choose this career because I love to help people and I think it is awesome to see change in a person’s eyes. I am also a great believer in the power of listening, empathy and the positive change it can bring about. I am fascinated by the human mind and love to discover creative ways to educate and encourage. In the meantime, I also a DJ for the children in my beautiful community, at all different events. I have a great love of music and have always been surrounded by it. My family is large, fun and gorgeous, I was raised by loving parents who took the time to be there and help me to become who I am today. I love presenting, facilitating and helping people to become more confident as helpers. Also, I am passionate about helping people lead better lives. All in all I look forward to tomorrow however live for today.

Ashley Norton Ashley is a woman of Dene/Cree & Metis decent.   She is an ambassador of her culture.  Ashley is a proud mother of two beautiful boys. She defines herself of an indigenous feminist, environmental activist, advocate and leader.

Her passion is working within First Nations and Metis communities. Ashley has certification in community work.  A graduate of Indigenous Women in Community Leadership Program, she’s a life skills coach, a facilitator for traditional parenting, an HIV/AIDS advocate and suicide awareness presenter.  Her most recent certification is in Mental Health First Aid First Nation

Ashley has a passion for learning and teaching Metis culture through exploration of Metis dance. This has helped her to involve other projects such as theater productions, fashion shows and dance productions. 

Ashley was a Co-Host and Co-Community Producer for The Four on Access 7, a local community television Indigenous women’s talk show in Regina.  The show provides an Indigenous women voice in the media business where they are not visible.  The show talks about current issues; breaking through stereotype and image of Indigenous women.  

Currently Ashley is focused on building her career in health and community development. As the Suicide Prevention Worker for Keewatin Yatthe Health Authority, Ashley has been challenged with many tasks. She has a regional position, her posting is out of the La Loche Friendship Center.

“Together with individuals, families and community we can promote and preserve LIFE!”

She truly believes that our connection to land based programming and bringing back our original traditional spiritually of the first peoples will help to restore balance to what is missing in today’s world. We need to look at how we are preserving our culture and heritage, how are our elders and youth interacting?  We need our elders healthy and knowledgeable to be able to pass on traditions, and if not we need to seek out ways to make this happen.

Throughout Ashley’s life she has maintained a responsibility as an Indigenous woman; committed and devoted to community wellness.  She is not her work, but her work becomes her.  Ashley’s passion for people is what motivates her to be in community; to educate and inspire many!

Registration Deadline: March 14, 2019

Fee: $735.00

Registration Notes:

 Registration includes a continental breakfast and lunch.